Racial & Ethnic Differences in West Virginia

DEFINITIONS

Ethnicity: The Office of Management and Budget requires federal agencies to use a minimum of two ethnicities: Hispanic or Latino and Not Hispanic or Latino. Hispanic origin can be viewed as the heritage, nationality group, lineage, or country of birth of the person or the person’s parents or ancestors before their arrival in the United States. People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race.

 Race: The Department of Health and Human Services and its agencies follow the racial categories developed by the Office of Management and Budget and used by the U.S. census. These categories generally reflect a social definition of race recognized in this country.  People who identify their origin as Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish may be of any race. Racial categories can include national origin or sociocultural groups.

Information on race is required for many federal programs and is important for making policy decisions, particularly for civil rights. States use these data to meet legislative redistricting principles. Race data also are used to assess environmental risks and racial disparities in health.

 DEMOGRAPHIC TRENDS – U.S. Census: West Virginia,  United States

White persons, percent, 2011 (a)

94.1%

78.1%

Black persons, percent, 2011 (a)

3.5%

13.1%

American Indian and Alaska Native persons, percent, 2011 (a)

0.2%

1.2%

Asian persons, percent, 2011 (a)

0.7%

5.0%

Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander persons, percent, 2011 (a)

0

0.2%

Persons reporting two or more races, percent, 2011

1.4%

2.3%

Persons of Hispanic or Latino Origin, percent, 2011 (b)

1.3%

16.7%

White persons not Hispanic, percen, 2011

93.0%

63.4%